Sunday, 5 December 2010

Women writing SF

I'd meant to post this ages ago (and thought I had, but since I cannot find it anywhere I must have been wrong) but Niall Harrison is asking people to email him their lists of the best works of SF by women in the last ten years. I'm currently agonising over my own list, but I hope more people will send in theirs. Entries to be in before midnight (British time, I assume) tonight. Please send in suggestions - it's a good thing that Niall is doing, and I look forward with interest to the results.

I will post my own (pathetically short) list* when I am satisfied with it.





*I suspect my problem is as much a result of not reading enough SF as it is of not reading enough books by women.

5 comments:

Aadisht said...

Gail Carriger will go in, right?

Fëanor said...

Catherine Asaro's Skolian Empire series started in the 1990s and continued through the 2000s. I've only read one, which was pretty good, all hard sci-fi.

Nancy Kress's Crossfire - serious shades of Prime Directive and all that.

Kirsten Bakis' Lives of the Monster Dogs - should probably not be in the list as it's more a fable than scifi. But good stuff!

Aishwarya said...

Aadisht - Alas, no. I'm willing to consider Carriger's books as science fiction of sorts, considering her world has this sort of internal scienciness to it. But much as I love her books I don't think I'd place them in a top ten of the decade list.

Feanor - I have read none of those, but will remedy this as soon as possible. The Bakis sounds particularly like the sort of thing I would read.

thene said...

Fuck, missed this til too late.

Something you should definitely read; Double Vision/Sound Mind by Tricia Sullivan (two halves of the same thing, that), and possibly also the one she wrote right before that, Maul. Sound Mind is one of the best things I've ever read. It's the only SF I've ever read in which the science in question is music. And Sullivan has a wonderful way of using hard SF concepts like alien life-forms and split realities to interrogate the really important things in life; shopping, advertising, TV, junk food... She is wonderful and her books make me so happy to be alive. See also Sullivan's thoughts on why women don't win SF awards any more.

Aishwarya said...

Thene - I'm a bit ashamed of myself for never having read anything by Sullivan (or Justina Robson, who I've also seen mentioned a lot in the context of this discussion). I know my library has some of Robson's stuff, so I really ought to get round to it.

What would your top ten have been if you'd had time?
(Does this mean you're back to blogging she asks, hopefully)