Wednesday, 3 February 2010

January Reading (III)

This is the last post in this set - a lot of the books I've read this month are pretty short, and reasonably light to get through. I highly doubt I'll be consuming anything like this much for the rest of this year.


Nirupama Subramanian - Keep The Change: Light and funny and very readable. Keep The Change is about a nice TamBrahm girl who gets into a rut, moves from Madras to Bombay, and deals with things like a corporate career and finding love. The cultural stereotyping-as-humour gets tiring at times (and you feel like the author never quite manages to get away from it, even when she's trying to undermine it a bit towards the end) but it's still a really enjoyable book.

Elsie J. Oxenham - A Dancer From the Abbey/ The Song of the Abbey: Girls' Own literature is one of my comfort reads, and though the Abbey series (which tend to be categorised as school stories, even though most of them have nothing to do with a school) is nowhere near as good as some of the other writing within the genre, it's a satisfyingly long series, which is obviously what one wants - I still haven't read the whole series yet. These particular books were pretty disappointing; they are some of the last in the series, and as far as I can tell the author is in a tearing hurry to marry off any adult female characters (bar the writers, for some reason) who might still be unattached. Both books follow pretty much the same pattern: nice young man with some sort of connection to the Abbey people returns from Africa to England, meets a member of the group around the Abbey, and is engaged to her by the end of the book. The book following these two, Two Queens at the Abbey (last book in the series) apparently has the same thing happen again. In future if I do choose to reread the Abbey books I think I'll try harder to ensure that the ones I pick aren't functionally identical.


Angela Carter - The Sadeian Woman: An Exercise in Cultural History: I had only ever read sections of this book before, and it is rather good. Of more significance to me, though, is that I was reading Carter critically for what may have been the first time, as opposed to reading her with fangirlish glee. This is new, and welcome, though I will continue to fangirl her whenever I want to.


H.G Wells - The Time Machine: Read as a companion piece of sorts to the awful Jaclyn the Ripper book I mentioned here. I hadn't read the book in years, and it was actually a lot better than I remembered it being (and I remembered it being pretty good). Even with such distractions as this.


Daisy Ashford - The Young Visiters (sic): The situation as I understand it: Nine year old Daisy Ashford writes a book; possibly quite good for a nine-year-old. In 1919, when Ashford is in her late thirties, it is published with a preface by J.M Barrie with the original typos because that's just so cute. Except it's mostly not cute, but annoying. Still, it does contain this lyrical tribute to bathrooms everywhere:
Then Mr Salteena got into a mouve dressing goun with yellaw tassles and siezing his soap he wandered off to the bath room which was most sumpshous. It had a lovly white shiny bath and sparkling taps and several towels arrayed in readiness by thourghtful Horace. It also had a step for climbing up the bath and other good dodges of a rich nature. Mr Salteena washed himself well and felt very much better.
For which I am willing to forgive it much.


P.G Wodehouse - The Mating Season: This is not one of my favourites, but it is a Wodehouse book and therefore deserving of my love. Bertie impersonates Gussie Fink-Nottle and Gussie impersonates Bertie (here I should say something clever about the instability of identity in Plum's works, but it all seems meaningless when you're talking about an author who in Piccadilly Jim has a character impersonating himself). Multiple engagements are broken and re-forged in various combinations, and there is random abuse of the constabulary and everything turns out well in the end.


Philip Reeve - Fever Crumb: This book really deserves a post to itself, and will probably get one in the next day or two. For now though - it's really good, though not quite as visceral as I recall A Darkling Plain being(which is rather an unfair comparison), and I definitely think it's best read after the Mortal Engines series, though it comes before them chronologically. And it's such a beautiful object, the hardback is solid and lovely and looks like it is made of wood. Definitely worth it.

So what are you reading?

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Absolution Gap, The Crow Road, Homage to Qwert Yuiop (not completely, selected essays) - for Feb

Narcissus and Goldmund, Invitation to a beheading (re-read), Complete short stories of JG Ballard - for March

AR

Sayak said...

The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown :P Don't judge me, I have been asked to read it! Also, I just finished Blindness by Saramago which was very good. And I keep reading Paperweight by Stephen Fry and Driven to Distraction by Jeremy Clarkson for comic relief. Actually, the Dan Brown book may qualify as comic relief as well...

pulicat said...

Will have to check out Mortal Engines and Fever Crumb!

I am currently reading Pandora in the Congo, Asterios Polyp and Girl who played with fire.